How to Make Your Dog House Warm During the Winter?

Tips to make your dog house warm and safe, and what important signs to notice when it's too cold outside (and it is time to bring your dog inside!)

If your dog normally spends the winter outside, then the least we can do for him is to prepare a warmer, cozier, place to sleep and get in out of the weather. Dog houses have come a long way in the past few decades, from a mere wooden box to a house that is actually geared toward comfort. The size of the doghouse is one of the most important features and should be determined by the size of the dog. How can we make sure our furry friend’s house is warm and cozy?

Here are a few tips to make your dog house warm during the winter:

1. Adjust the size of the house

Since most of the warmth generated inside the house is due to body heat, a house that is too large will not retain enough heat. On the other hand, a house that is too small will not allow your pet to sit up, stand up, or stretch out. Where the doghouse is located is another important factor. We have all seen doghouses in some open backyard or field, where it is susceptible to winter winds and hot blazing summer sun. Doghouses should be placed in protective areas, shielded from the wind, and certainly shaded from the summer sun.

2. Insulate the House

Today’s doghouse models often come with insulated flooring and walls, and heavy plastic flaps over the doorways. But if you are building your own, or renovating an existing model, you can easily add needed insulation. Make sure that the house isn’t placed directly on the cold ground. Just as we need flooring insulation, so does your pet.
If possible, add some Styrofoam or other insulation to the underside of the house, and to the walls. Check for air leaks around the house, and seal with caulk, and do make sure that the roof is leak proof. In an emergency, you can seal the sides and roof with heavy plastic sheeting. Also, if your doghouse doesn’t have a flap over the door, this is an easy fix. Any heavy plastic or heavy material that is relatively waterproof will do.

3. Add A Warm Blanket

Some dogs like something inside the house to bed down on and some do not. There is straw bedding available that can be used, but it will need to be replaced on a regular basis. Mats can be added to the floors where your pet will be sleeping, but if you add a blanket or other heavy material, you will need to take them out and wash them periodically since they do become matted and hard.

When temperatures drop…

Of course, unless your pet is used to Arctic cold, pay close attention to winter temperatures, and when they drop below zero, or even when you just know it too cold outside for your dog, let him get inside and into a warmer area.

 

Photo by Matthew Wells from Pexels

 

How To Tell If Your Dog Is Too Cold?

Dogs with short hair, small breed, puppies, older dogs and dogs with health conditions are particularly sensitive to the cold and may feel too cold faster than others.
These signs can indicate your dog is suffering from cold.

Your dog is Shivering

Shivering or Trembling, are the first signs for cold because dogs react to the cold a lot as humans do. If the dog is shivering, and holding his tail close to his body, he may be feeling cold. Shivering, shaking and trembling are ways that the body reacts to try to keep warm.

Cold Ears & Cold Body

Feeling your dog’s ears is a good way to tell his temperature. If the ears feel cold, particularly around the edges, you might consider taking him inside. Also, pay attention to your dog’s body – if his body feels too cold, staying outside is probably not a good idea.

Slow Movements

If your dog walks slowly, and keep his tail close to his body as if he’s trying to keep himself warm, it is better taking him inside the house.

Curling Up

If your dog is curling up into a ball shape? Or keeping his tail tucked in and shivering, he is probably trying to warm himself with body heat. It’s another sign it is better inside the house.
Remember: If your dog acts in an unusual way (Whining or barking, agitated or anxious), make sure he has enough protection from wind and cold.

 

And Don’t Forget to Clean the Pet Beds…

Pet’s beds are a place that odors, so if you start smelling something that is off, check the pet bedding and consider washing it. (This tip brought to you by Clutter Kepper)

 

Shop It: PupRug Faux Fur Orthopedic Dog Bed

 

Shop It: PupLounge Memory Foam Dog Bed

Images: Treat A Dog

 

About the author
A Copywriter by day, and a crafty mom wannabe by the time I don't really have. Writes about all the things you might love on the Internet.

One Comment

  1. During those walks, all that ice, deicer and salt can build up in your dog s paws. And if your dog then licks them, he could be ingesting harmful poisons. Every time you come in from the cold, be sure to wipe down your dog s paws and check for ice buildup. Also, be sure to keep your dog s nails trimmed.

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